Monthly Archives: September, 2013

Free E-Book This Week Only: Education for Liberation: The Top 20 Questions and Answers for Black Homeschoolers

Free E-Book Here

black homeschool

Greetings,

I hope that you can benefit from this valuable information provided by Dr. Samori Camara.  Download the full book free on your Kindle this week only.

While we all have our unique approaches to homeschooling, it is important to understand major methods as relates to what is best for our children.  African Centered Education, as encouraged by Dr. Camara, puts African antiquity and modernity in the center of what can be a highly multicultural curriculum.  Consider that there are thousands of cultures within the African Diaspora for our children to learn about, as well as European and Asiatic cultures.

Have your children learned about the Ashanti or the Mau-Mau?  What about the Ba-Aka or Maasai?  Does your child smile when he or she hears that you are about to recount an Anansi tale?  Does he or she get excited at the thought of plantains or fufu?  If you have not already researched African Centered Education, you will learn more about it in this free e-book, as well as gaining insights into homeschooling that will help any parent.

The book description on Amazon is as follows:

Are you ready to take the education of your child into your own hands? Are you disgusted with over testing and miseducation? Are you unsure about how to go about getting started on the journey of providing education for liberation?

Then, this book is for you. Within it, I use my years of practice and research to answer the most pressing questions new homeschooling parents have. No need to scour the internet getting half-truths and whole lies. The answers are here.

Will your child be able to go to college? Without question!

Can you do it? Absolutely!

“As parents you are the first teachers, so why not continue that natural process. You can teach your child using a culturally relevant curriculum, cultivate their minds and grow their spirits, and help bring out the natural genius already within them. You can find the time, resources, and faith to give your child the greatest gift: the gift of self-love, self-awareness, and self-determination.”

About the author:

Samori Camara, Ph.D., is the Founder and Director of Kamali Academy, an African-centered school in New Orleans, and is quickly becoming one of the nation’s leading authorities on Black education and building independent Black educational institutions.

Kamali Academy in New Orleans:

kamali

All the Best to You and Your Family,

Nikala Asante

 

Choosing Homeschooling for Special Needs: Guest Post by Stacie Wyatt

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Homeschooling: Why I chose this alternative, crazy path?

My sister, Nikala, asked me to write a guest post for her blog, Black HomeSchool Mom. I thought my sister was nuts for homeschooling her son. Who wants to design curriculum? Who wants to deal with kids at home all day long? As you can tell, I was not a fan of having my kids at home all day. I love to ship them off on the bus, then head back to bed, maybe clean up in peace.

I never thought I would homeschool anyone, but myself.

In 2011, my oldest son moved from Georgia to Texas to live with me. His father had him solo since 2005 and it was now my turn. My maternal gene finally kicked in after having Kalen and I thought it was a good idea. School started down here within 2 weeks. Mama kicked into overdrive to get Brad enrolled in public school. He had his issues (meltdowns) but he did good until the end of the school year. Note: Brad is Autistic, ADHD, and has sensory issues.

His behavior issues got worse on the bus and in school. I was getting messages home from the bus drivers daily to the point where I was starting to dread him coming home from school. There was little written notes, but a lot of verbal notes. They wanted him off the bus and out of school. I even put him back on medication to control the behavior (Risperidone and Clonindine) but then it didn’t kick in fast enough for the bus drivers (since they was the ones giving me the messages).

Brad bit a student, but I did not find out until two weeks later. Brad also hugged a student, who was also special needs, but more verbal. She complained. The school had to separate the two students in the line, waiting for the bus. Even made Brad a bus line helper to aid the situation. He also had an increase in meltdowns, but no one knew why. His routine did not change at home, but I have no idea if something changed at school.

My son could not get kicked off the special needs bus and the special needs class. I had no way to get him to and from school. My mother did not get home until after school started. I started looking into alternatives for Brad. Private school. Online school. My church’s new charter school. Private school did not take medicaid. Church school did not accept Brad. He did not make the initial lottery pick. Then, the administration called a few weeks before school started because the enrollment was still low. I brought all my paperwork but got declined because I did not have a mortgage or rent agreement in my name.

I had heard about Brad’s home school on television before, but did nothing. I finally filled out an interest form on the website. He was enrolled. I still don’t like my child being at home all the freaking time, but I also don’t have to worry about those messages being sent home. I understand now that legally no one can put a special needs child off the bus or out of school without an IEP meeting and trying to make accommodations first. This will come in handy whenever I send Brad back to public school. I hate to send him back and run into the same problems, then have to pull him again.

The school creates their own curriculum, since it is a public school alternative. They send the books, the computer, and other materials. I have to log-in daily to attend live classes and log attendance. His work is scanned in weekly and uploaded to the drop box. If he needs to go to the doctor, I do have to get a dr’s note.

I also loveeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee Jose, Brad’s in-person speech therapist. Jose comes to the house once a week and teaches Brad. Brad has made tremendous improvement since Jose started working with Brad in May, 2012. Brad was also receiving online speech therapy. I can live without that, as long as I have in-person. With public school, Brad received 8 sessions of speech total. I asked for more, but he never got it. I am thinking about re-enrolling Brad in public school next semester or next year. I wish there was cheaper special needs schools in the area. I am dreading sending him back. But anyway. Have a nice day.

Stacie Wyatt

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About me:

Stacie Wyatt is a 33 year old, African-American, living in Houston. Stacie is also a published poet and author (Love.Lust.Life; Chocolate Kisses; Conversations 1; Conversations 2; Conversing with Normality; Conversing with Sexuality; Conversing with Salvation, and Miscarried). Her books are on Amazon (CreateSpace and Kindle), Lulu, Barnes and Noble, Audible, and Smashwords. She is also a blogger (Perfect Chaos and Celibacy Diaries). Next, Stacie is the mother of two special needs boys. Stacie loves to read, write, listen to music, and find free stuff online.

Social Media:

Perfect Chaos

Perfect Chaos Fan Page

Celibacy Diaries

Celibacy Diaries Fan Page

Twitter

Pinterest

Klout

Google Plus

Youtube

Vine (sdwyatt)

Instagram

Kalen and Brad fan page

SDW Poet Fan Page

Amazon Author Page

 

African Centered Curriculum

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Greetings!

Many Black parents want to create a culturally astute homeschool for their children, but do not know where to begin.  Unfortunately, there is not a ton of packaged curricula available that begins in ancient Africa and follows the Diaspora to modern times.  The great news is, there are committed young people working to make this happen.

One such brother is Dr. Samori Camara of New Orleans, Louisiana.

samori

He founded and continues to maintain an African-centered homeschool collective, Kamali Academy.  Kamali has received national press for its effectiveness, in publications such as Source Magazine.  Dr. Camara has also published a book and many videos to assist parents with home education.  In addition, he provides online classes in subjects such as Mental Math, The Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, and Afrikan Literature (the “k” in Afrikan representing African people all over the world, rather than only on the continent).

Presently, Dr. Camara has continued his path of creating a strong body of resources for home educators by building a detailed K-12 Curriculum.  The entire collection can be purchased for immediate download at a cost comparable to purchasing one subject textbook for one child.  Preview or purchase the curriculum here (http://www.kamaliacademy.com/curriculum/).

While it is important to have guidance, it is just as crucial that we continue to compile pedagogical ideas and curriculum that we feel are relevant to the canon of African-centered education.  As we share that content, we can expand the amount of information available for future educators.

All Best,

Nikala Asante