Tag Archives: Ghana

Yoruba Names Lesson Plan

Yoruba Names Lesson Plan

Greetings!

I hope that your week is going well.  Today, after a discussion about the meaning of names, I felt inspired to search for a lesson plan about the reverence given to the naming process in Africa.  Sometimes, people ridicule African names because they may be difficult to pronounce.  It is important that we teach our children respect for names, no matter how different that they may sound.

For instance, in Nigeria, Abayomiolorunkoje is one name for a boy from the Yoruba ethnic group.  In America, a boy may be teased for having a name so complex.  However, in Yoruba, the name means, “People wanted to humiliate me, but God does not allow [it]“.

Follow the link for an awesome lesson plan on Yoruba names, appropriate for students 2nd grade and above.  One note: the link to the Smithsonian website within the lesson plan did not work, so you can visit this site (http://www.onlinenigeria.com/nigeriannames/Yoruba.asp) for a list of Yoruba names and their meanings.

This lesson plan can also be adjusted for discussion on Akan day names (http://www.twi.bb/akan-names.php).  The Akan people in Ghana oftentimes name their children based on the days that the children were born.  It would be very simple to have an Akan naming ceremony as part of a unit about Ghana.

Enjoy, and all feedback is welcomed.

All Best,

Nikala Asante

Teaching Ancient African Civilizations During Black History Month

Teaching Ancient African Civilizations During Black History Month

Greetings,

One consistent major issue of American education has been the lack of Black History set before Africans were enslaved in America.  Ask an average child what Africans were doing before before slavery and they will most likely have no idea.  Worse yet, they may believe that Africans were “savages” and had no civilizations before America.

One site that I enjoy for teaching Ancient African History is Mr. Donn.  As a scholar, I do not agree with every detail about every civilization that he covers, but he provides an adequate amount of balanced history.  The civilizations of Egypt, Kush, Ghana, Mali, and Songhay are covered with outlines of their daily lives, entertaining stories, powerpoints, maps, free clip art, and activities.

I do not agree with the accuracy of all the images included because none of the ancient Egyptian images are Black.  It has been proven by Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop that the early Egyptian dynasties were ruled by Black Africans (read: The African Origin of Civilization by Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop).  He even did melanin tests to validate these claims.  There were also Egyptians who appeared as Caucasian or Middle Easterners do today, both of African descent and from migration of foreign peoples.  I believe that Egyptians of all skin tones should be portrayed, for sake of accuracy.

Thus, I would encourage you to use the histories, enjoy the activities, and not to take the images at face value.  Have a wonderful Black History Month.  May our education on the histories of Black people around the world truly advance!

All Best,

Nikala Asante