Tag Archives: home schooling

Cooking as Curriculum

Greetings,

I hope that you are enjoying the holiday season.   We have definitely been enjoying spending time with family, cooking, and eating.  Especially the eating.

Being vegan for only 4 years, cooking food for the holidays has been a learning process.  There is always the simple route – grabbing some Tofurky and a box a stuffing, but that’s not my style.  For the past few years, I have been making a vegan gumbo with ample sides for Thanksgiving.  This year, I included my son in the cooking process from start to finish.  He washed, chopped, stirred, and baked to his heart’s content.

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Having fun making potato salad.

Which brings me to the reason for this post, do you include cooking classes in your child’s curriculum?  If so, for which reasons?  If not, for which reasons?  Personally, I believe that Home Economics are a natural part of the homeschooling environment.  Children being involved in these processes is fun and teaches them to be responsible adults.  I still remember recipes from cooking with my grandmother at age 9 or 10.

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Vegan gumbo, potato salad, coleslaw, and hot water cornbread.

So, you may be wondering, where do I start?  I would recommend starting with these awesome no-bake chocolate peanut butter cookies, great for any age, Kindergarten and up, with adult supervision.  We adapted this to vegan by using almond milk and Earth Balance butter.  We also sprinkled in a few vegan chocolate chips and threw some coconut flakes on top.

Vegan gluten free no bake oatmeal chocolate peanut butter cookies.

Vegan gluten free no bake oatmeal chocolate peanut butter cookies.

 

You can also check out this neat list of vegan no-bake desserts if you want to keep it simple and healthy.

Here is a cool Pinterest collection of vegan recipes for children.

Understanding that everyone is not vegan, here is an awesome collection of omnivore recipes from Kid’s Health.

And a whole host of kid-friendly recipes from All Recipes.

Enjoy making some of these delicious recipes with your little shining stars and we will chat again soon!

All Best,

Nikala Asante

 

 

 

 

 

 

October is Black Science Month!

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Greetings,

If you have never heard of Black Science Month, it is no fault of yours.  This special time to celebrate Africana scientists was recently established by four young African Americans: Leonce Hall, Kimberly Washington, Sydeaka Poisson, and Asar Imhotep.  They are committed to “promoting the accomplishments and achievements of Blacks in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics”.  Currently, while Black Science Month’s website is under construction, the collective is sharing tons of valuable information on their FaceBook Page (https://www.facebook.com/BlackScienceMonth).  Some of their recent posts concern free medical school for Blacks and Latinos, a link to a Black inventor online museum, and a cartoon with Black characters personifying the scientific method.

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Blacks are “not good” in Math or Science is a long proclaimed myth that through self-fulfilled prophecy, is affecting many of our children each day.  How many of our boys believe that they are supposed to excel in athletics and struggle with academics?  How many of our girls believe that computer programming and electrical engineering is only for Whites and Asians?  Projects like Science Genius B.A.T.T.L.E.S (a hip-hop based science program) and Black Girls Code  (both of which are shared on Black Science Month) are working diligently to change these myths.

Fallacies about Africans in Science are also dismantled by Black Science Month.  Many students believe that Africa is one big charity case or war zone, based on images that they have seen in the media.  Learning about the Nigerian who built a jet car that runs on the road and sea or the South African student who invented a waterless shower will open students’ eyes to a new reality.  A reality in which their history and present is inundated with creative genius.

Asar Imhotep, a University of Houston Linguistics alum, states that he got involved with creating the page, “to encourage Black people to participate more in the various sciences, whether it be Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Agriculture…”.  Imhotep gave us the inside scoop on what’s next for Black Science Month – exciting science experiments that children can conduct at home!  Like the page on FaceBook and stay tuned throughout the year for news, history, opportunities, and much more!

All Best,

Nikala Asante