Tag Archives: homeschool mother

Book Release! Tomorrow Will Be Better (plus a contest)

Greetings!

I hope that you and your family are doing well.  Exciting news!  I’ve recently released my newest book - Tomorrow Will Be Better.  Tomorrow Will Be Better is an intimate conversation, a history primer, a discussion of current events, a Spoken Word Collection, and an invitation to engagement in social justice – all in one.   It is a non-fiction book with a target audience of African American youth between ages 14 and 25 seeking to better understand themselves and their roles in the world (although it is appropriate and a great learning tool for persons of ANY ethnicity, ages 14 and up).

As a thank you for your continual support, I am giving out free e-copies of Tomorrow Will Be Better to the first 10 readers to comment on this blog!  Additionally, those who re-post this blog to their page will be entered to win print copies of Tomorrow Will Be Better (with a US mailing address).  Thank you for your support and be sure to check out the full description below!

Tomorrow Will Be Better by Nikala Asante (<—- View Table of Contents and read a sample on Amazon)

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Best,

Nikala Asante

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Hello, I’m Nikala Asante – a 29 year old mother, creative writer, Spoken Word artist, independent educator, Web Series producer, and international Human Rights advocate.  As the mother of a 10 year old son, the future of our youth is extremely important to me. In this vein – for the past 6 years, I have been actively tutoring and mentoring inner-city high school and college students. Through this work, I have been blessed with an understanding of the challenges that my generation and my son’s generation faces, as well as methods to overcome these challenges.

Concurrently, I have been blessed to traverse 9 countries in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean over the past 4 years, engaging in service and research projects that granted me a greater understanding of the world at large. All of this from the basis of a rough upbringing, earning my GED at age 22, surviving an abusive relationship, and many other immense struggles on the path to self-actualization.

Now, I am sharing my own life story, documentation of my travels, historical and cultural context for each place that I visited, how these histories and cultures connect to current events in the United States, and creative responses to what I have witnessed a concise collection of chapters, Spoken Word and interactive workshop modules. I earnestly believe that this book can and will change lives. I appreciate your support!

Who This Book Is Written For

This book is targeted to African American youth, ages 14 -25, but can be enjoyed by any mature reader.

About The Author

Nikala Asante is a creative writer, Spoken Word artist, web series producer, independent educator, and international Human Rights advocate from Houston, TX. Asante fell in love with organizing around Human Rights after traveling to the Dominican Republic to learn about garment worker rights organizing with Solidarity Ignite in 2013. Since then, she has returned to Dominican Republic and Haiti independently and with the University of Houston to help set up medical clinics, to distribute food and water, to plant food bearing trees in deforested areas, to deliver needed supplies, children’s vitamins, and toys to orphanages, and to create archives of personal narratives about Haiti’s 2010 earthquake.

In her community, Asante organizes homeschooling parents around educational events and field trips to advance their children’s learning experiences, as well as tutoring and mentoring inner-city youth. Asante has received numerous awards from the community and university, including the prestigious Gilman International Study Scholarship. She was featured in Defender Networks’ Black History special on young leaders following in the footsteps of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr in 2013, on PBS NewsHour in 2015, and has spoken on Human Rights in two documentaries (“16th Strike: the Documentary” and “Nice: A Place to Start”).

Asante has published two collections of poetry, Graffiti Nommo and Re-Divining Self. Additionally, Asante recently published her first web series in 5 episodes, Pharaoh the Web Series — available for viewing on YouTube. She is currently in the process of developing her own non-profit to connect students with international service learning opportunities – Asante Global Works.

nikalaasante.com

Asante Global Works

blackhomeschoolmom.com

Pharaoh the Web Series

Awesome Resource Alert: What to Teach

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Awesome Resource Alert: What to Teach

Greetings,

I hope the week has been treating you and your family well.  Mothers often tell me, “I would homeschool, but I wouldn’t know what to teach”.

There are several ways to solve this problem including using existing systems printed or online, researching to develop a curriculum, joining a Collective, or having your child to attend an online public, private, or charter school from home such as K12, Connections Academy, or Aya Educational Institute.

One system that includes everything that you “need to teach”, the idea being that national standards are met in core areas, is Time4Learning.  I personally use Time4Learning to supplement what I teach and know several parents that use it for their full home school curriculum.  It is a paid site, $19.95 per child and $14.95 for each additional child.  The main subjects included are Math, Science, English Language Arts, Social Studies, and Art.

I like Time4Learning because the lessons are entertaining and effective.  The site tracks attendance and grades which is a great help for my home school portfolio.  I can see where my son might have struggled in an area and later made major improvements.  For parents who use Time4Learning for their full curriculum, the grading tool is invaluable.  I highly recommend the site for new home schoolers.  You can boldly teach culturally attuned lessons and take your children on relevant field trips while knowing that all the “basics” are covered.  I hope this helps!

All Best,

Nikala Asante

P.S.: I am not being paid by Time4Learning for this post, but if they want to send me a check, I will cash it! ;) Have a great week.

What Kind of Adults Will Our Children Be? Part 1

Greetings,

The goal of the many sacrifices that we make to educate our children are for one reason and one reason only: to shape them into successful, critically thinking, and independent adults with good characters.

Which traits are representative of these ideal adults that we are molding?

Dr. Amos Wilson, author of many books on African American child psychology, such as The Developmental Psychology of the Black Child and Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children, offers a list of attributes to cultivate in Black children based on traditional African values.

  • respect for adults
  • independence
  • persistence
  • curiosity
  • experimentation
  • discovery
  • universal sense of justice
  • respect for order
  • social interest
  • good manners
  • sensitivity to persons and environment
  • self-esteem/family and community pride
  • commitment to promises made or contracts
  • love of learning
  • ethnic/cultural identity
  • general care for humans of all races
  • reverence for life

How do we nurture these traits within our children?  

The first and best way to teach our children any good habit is to model it.  Outside of that, whichever spiritual system that we practice will serve as much of the moral foundation for our children.  Even if you do not consider yourself religious, be sure to discuss morals on a regular basis.

We can also look to the moral guidelines from traditional Africa and teach our children not just to memorize them, but to practice them in daily life.

The Nguzo Saba

The Nguzo Saba is a character-guiding system based on East African tenets.  It was adapted in the 20th century by Maulana Karenga, an African American scholar into seven simple principles.

NGUZO SABA
(The Seven Principles)

Kwanzaa Symbol - Umoja (unity)   Umoja (Unity)
To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.
Kwanzaa symbol- Kujichagulia (self-determination   Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)
To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for                   ourselves.
Kwanzaa Symbol - Ujima (collective work and responsibility)    Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)
To build and maintain our community together and make our brother’s and   sister’s problems our problems and to solve them together.
  Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)
To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to   profit from them together.
Kwanzaa symbols - Nia (purpose)   Nia (Purpose)
To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community   in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
Kwanzaa symbol - Kuumba (Creativity)   Kuumba (Creativity)
To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our   community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
Kwanzaa symbol - Imani (faith) Imani (Faith)
To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

How can we practice the Nguzo Saba?

We can think of creative ways to incorporate the Seven Principles into our daily lives.

For instance, unity can be demonstrated by working as a team to cook a healthy dinner or clean the house.  Unity can also be practiced by working together to accomplish a larger goal, such as cleaning up a block in our neighborhood.

My son and I sometimes go downtown to help feed the homeless.  We meet up with a wonderful group here in Houston that serves dinner to over 100 people 4 times a week.  When we go there and interact with homeless of all races and genders that we might normally pass by on the street, it has a profound impact on both me and my son.

This week, let us all practice the first principle, Unity, in creative ways.  Please leave feedback in the comments about how Unity was applied in your home this week.

Over the coming blogs on this topic, I will suggest methods for implementing the other 6 principles as well as introduce other traditional African moral systems.

Stay tuned!

(Artwork by BrothaJ2 from deviantart.com)